How do accepted definitions of stigma run so deep (in the us, and not just in the uk) that the poor themselves believe all (other) poor are to be blamed for their poverty because of their preference for ‘poor choices.’

You will be given your choice of weekly themes to expand upon and explore further through a Take home essay (min 4 full pgs. each). Although you are invited to browse ahead in the course in planning your five Take home essays using the questions I provide, you are also encouraged to include the additional questions & connections that you also like to add drawing upon interesting aspects of that unit’s discussion. Please be specific in highlighting and comparing the unit’s material in your take home essays. The different kind of viewpoint or emphasis you give to the details of your choice of an optional reading in relation to that unit’s anchor reading cannot be ‘right or wrong’ but are meant to be specifically interesting and engaging for you (and a potential classmate). Concerns and conclusions different from an author’s (or instructor’s) are welcome. Good essays will engage the material as you see it but add to the amount of detail and thought important to the discussion.
Compare / Contrast Optional reading & unit themes that you or your peers choose to incorporate for your turn to expand an interest in the course
Option – A
Sullivan, Esther. “Displaced in place: Manufactured housing, mass eviction, and the paradox of state intervention.” American Sociological Review 82.2 (2017): 243-269. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0003122416688667 [ Author’s Abstract ]
This article examines housing insecurity within manufactured housing—the single largest source of unsubsidized affordable housing in the United States, home to about 18 million low-income residents. A large portion of manufactured housing is installed in mobile home parks, which can legally close at any time, displacing entire communities. Based on two years living within and being evicted from closing mobile home parks in two states, this comparative ethnography of mass eviction juxtaposes sites of distinctive state practices for managing the forced relocation of park residents. I analyze the experience of eviction in Florida, a site of explicit intervention and “model” legislation for mobile home park closures, in light of the experience in Texas, where the state has adopted a hands-off approach. I describe the paradoxical effects of Florida’s protective, yet market-oriented, state housing interventions, which produced both a cottage industry of mobile home relocation services and a more protracted, pernicious eviction for displaced residents. I outline the specific mechanisms through which this paradox of state intervention occurred and consider the implications not only for mobile home parks but also for a variety of other state programs that are currently being delivered through an adaptive reliance on the private sector.
Option – B
Jun, Miyang. “Stigma and shame attached to claiming social assistance benefits: Understanding the detrimental impact on UK lone mothers’ social relationships.” Journal of Family Studies 28.1 (2022): 199-215. Stigma and shame attached to claiming social assistance benefits: understanding the detrimental impact on UK lone mothers’ social relationships (researchgate.net) [ Author’s Abstract ]
Although 32% of poor households in the UK are working, why does public opinion label households that require public benefits ‘shirkers?’ How are social failings to provide citizens jobs at above a rudimentary pay rate or mothers realistic daycare options for their ambition to work misrecognized by politicians and the media as the individual’s problem of their lazy dependence choosing to burden society in order to live a shiftless lifestyle? What assumptions about a willful ‘brood’ are leveled against single parent households in today’s economy, and why is ‘the reluctance to marry’ seen as the only problem (and example of immorality) in contemporary UK society? How did US stereotypes of a Culture of Poverty and the shift to punitive welfare policies echo the false claims of English commentators concerning economic justice problems in the UK? How have recent US findings that unemployment rates are decreasing in part because of the number of Americans who must take more than one job in order to work much more than full time to earn a living wage? How do accepted definitions of stigma run so deep (in the US, and not just in the UK) that the poor themselves believe all (other) poor are to be blamed for their poverty because of their preference for ‘poor choices.’